Returning Abroad to Work, Study, Intern, or Volunteer

Photo by Jinny Cheung

Have you studied abroad and can’t wait to return to the same destination or another exciting international location? There are lots of ways to return abroad.  Below are some examples of paths you could take to continue your international adventures.

This list was compiled by Syracuse Abroad in collaboration with Syracuse University Career Services.

Work or Intern Abroad

Whether you decide to pursue employment with a top-tier company or prefer to traverse the globe doing odd jobs, the resources below can help direct you.

  • Connect with the specialists at the Career Services Office on your home campus for advice on how to obtain an international job or internship. Syracuse University students can contact Career Services here on campus.
  • Resources:
    • OrangeLink
      • Network! Jobs for Syracuse University students and alumni are listed on OrangeLink here! Upload your resume, schedule interviews, read about employers, and much more.
      • Narrowing a job search to a very specific position within one location can be tricky, so if you’re having trouble then try broadening the type of work or area you’d like to be in. Rather than applying to international positions, you could also apply for jobs in the US in a travel division, or work your way up through a domestic company and then try transfer to an international location.
    • Goinglobal
      • Goinglobal provides country-specific information on job resources, employment trends, work visas, and more.
      • Syracuse students can access Goinglobal by logging into Orange Link through MySlice. This service is free to all Syracuse University students and alumni. You can view available jobs and internships, look through Country Career Guides (tool kits filled with information on working/living in different around the world), and much more.
    • Many job search sites have international search functions, such as:
  • If you are interested in a China-related job, you will want to explore these sites:
  • Work Your Way Around the World: The Globetrotter’s Bible by Susan Griffith includes first-hand accounts from people who have traveled the world by working jobs along the way.
  • International Jobs by Nina Segal is considered “the most authoritative guide for researching and launching an international career.”
  • Teaching English Abroad: Your Expert Guide to Teaching English Around the World by Susan Griffith. Whether you are a trained teacher or want to travel the globe, this book provides hundreds of leads to schools around the globe for both short-term and long-term opportunities
  • See the Career Services alumni panel on working abroad for some great tips from ‘Cuse alums!
  • Have a particular interest in France? Campus France offers a new online platform where individuals who spent time studying abroad in France can connect with each another, stay up to date on French business and culture as well as discover professional opportunities.
  • Teaching Assistant Program in France (TAPIF) is a joint initiative of the French Ministry of Education, the Cultural Services of the French Embassy, and the Centre international d’etudes pedagogiques (CIEP).
  • InterExchange works with cooperating agencies in more than 60 countries to offer cultural exchange experiences to young people and their hosts.
  • Work abroad with younger populations:
    • AuPairWorld
    • Backroads: Opportunities to work as Seasonal Trip Leaders and Field Staff for biking outings in Europe, Canada, and U.S.
    • National Geographic: Trip Leader opportunities throughout the world
    • Bold Earth Teen Adventures: Opportunities to be an adult Trip Leader in the teen adventure travel industry
    • The Student Diplomacy Corps seeks mature, responsible study abroad alums who have some post-college work experience to help lead small groups of underserved high school students on a summer abroad programs focused on college readiness in 12 countries. Contact Breeze Willis at rbwillis@sdcorps.org for more information.

Enter the International Education Field

  • Help other students study abroad. Lessons From Abroad provides some good ideas for breaking into the field of international education.
  • The SECUSSA listserv is a mainstay for study abroad professionals and posts both domestic and international positions.
  • Consider working for an Admissions Office and recruit international students from around the world for a U.S. university.

Teach Abroad

  • It is not necessary to have an English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) certificate to teach English abroad but it can be highly advantageous. Some teaching opportunities are paid positions; some organizations provide a teaching experience at a charge to you.
  • Check out resources such as:

Volunteer Abroad

Graduate Studies Abroad

Research Abroad

Disclaimer: Providing information about international opportunities does not constitute an endorsement by Syracuse University or Syracuse Abroad. Syracuse University and Syracuse Abroad are not agents for these programs and do not guarantee their quality. The listings are provided for your information only.